D.C. Police Chief Admits that Charlie Sheen Escort Violated Department Policies

In his article in the Washington Times about the Charlie Sheen Police Escort,  Matthew Cella quoted MPD Police Chief Cathy Lanier as having admitted that the Sheen escort broke multiple department rules.  No offense Cathy or Matthew, but those of us in the Executive Protection field realized that, the minute we saw crazy Charlie taking a cell phone picture of the speed odometer, documenting for the world to see that the D.C. Police cruiser in front was pushing 80 miles an hour, 30 miles outside of their jurisdiction.

I do have to say, that Chief Lanier sounded very honest and open during the WTOP radio interview this afternooon when talking about how one of her “middle managers” (“probably a Lieutenant”, she said) wrongfully authorized the problematic escort of a Hollywood celebrity.  I was about ready to give her a “thumbs up” until she began justifying why her officers would have broken the rules.   

Chief Lanier went on to tell the interviewer that it wasn’t really that surprising that her officers went outside of their jurisdiction, sped and drove with their emergency lights flashing.  “Afterall”, she said, “Police are only human and we can’t expect them not to be awe struck when dealing with celebrities”.  What you talkin’ about Cathy? 

Yes, Police Officers are human, but no – they are certainly not like the average citizen.  They go through a different training, have broad sweeping powers that regular people do not share and have the ability to take another’s liberty and even life, if necessary.  They should damn well be held to a higher standard and we should expect far more from them than we would do from a 13 year old girl waiting for a “Bieber appearance” outside of a concert hall.  

I would wager that if you took a survey of all Executive Protection Agents (definitely all E.P. Agency owners), they would tell you that when they are hired to work in close proximity of a celebrity, they are not “awe struck” by that person.  If I ever discovered that one of my bodyguards had broken the law or embarrased my company or themselves on an E.P. detail, that would be the last time they would work for me.  The ironic thing is that when it comes to private sector Executive Protection, most Agents are more highly trained and experienced than local Police Officers.         

Apparently, the Metropolitan Police Department rules allows officers to perform escort duty for The President, Vice Prez, visiting Heads of State and the Mayor.  I sure am glad that I am not an MPD “middle manager” trying to figure out which category that “Tiger Blood” Charlie fits into. 

Overseas travel could be more dangerous following Bin Laden’s death.

While the U.S. (and other Nations) rejoices following the news of Bin Laden’s death, those about to embark on overseas travel, especially those holding U.S. passports, should exercise extreme caution.

Not only has the State Department issued travel alerts (http://www.emergencyemail.org/newsemergency/anmviewer.asp?a=1058&z=1 ), but a plethora of INTEL and Govt. types have also issued warnings concerning the need to be aware of the possibility of retaliatory attacks.   It is too simplistic to feel that Bin Laden’s demise will bring about the downfall of Al-Qaeda.  

Whilst it is true that the A.Q. organization will be “leaderless” until they can find a suitable replacement, this does not mean that they are not capable of inflicting serious casualties to “get back” at those who have denied them of their leader.  This can be looked upon as a type of “wounded animal” syndrome. 

Speaking on CNN’s “Piers Morgan” last night, former NYC Mayor, Rudy Giuliani said; “in the short term we are in more danger, but in the longer term, we will be safer”.  The question remains however; ”how long is “in the short term”?  I have an immediate vested interest in trying to understand the viewpoint of these grieving radicals, since I will be flying to a volatile part of Asia next week.

My advice is not to take chances with your safety.  If travel can not be avoided or postponed, focus intently on your own personal safety and on the safety of those you send overseas – whether employees or family members.  This reminds me of a call I received from a potential client last year. 

He and other staff members were going to Pakistan to form a joint venture involving a lucrative project for his company.  He was concerned for their safety and asked about bringing U.S. bodyguards on the trip.  The host company in Pakistan told him that they would provide the foreigners with local security.

Having worked around the world on many International assignments, I was experienced in how certain countries train their personnel.  I advised the potential new client to bring experienced U.S. security personnel as part of their team.  The busines owner was concerned that he might insult his new business partners if they discovered that they had brought their own security consultants. 

This is why it is important to find a highly experienced security consultant and LISTEN to what they tell you.  There are ways to include highly trained and experienced security personnel with your staff so that they blend in as engineers or legal assitants or whatever else may be your business.  What you should NEVER do, is to to compromise your safety or the safety of your employees.   

If something happens, what effect do you think it will have on your company’s reputation?  Ask yourself is it worth it.  Our advice to you is not to rely on local resources, but to bring those experts with you – either openly or covertly.  Remember that training standards in many other parts of the world are nowhere near the level that they are in the U.S.

New online sign-up for P.I., Executive Protection and Firearms Training

Sexton Executive Security is pleased to announce that applicants for any of our training programs; Defensive Tactics, Firearms, Private Investigator or Executive Protection/Personal Protection Specialist, can now apply directly online.

Our newly restructured website will allow applicants to register and pay for training courses, 24 hours a day, from anywhere in the world.  In addition, we will soon have training manuals, e-books, unique SEXTON items (t-shirts, shooting caps, mag lights, etc) for sale via the new “shopping cart” feature of the site.

There will also be a section where employment opportunities, discounted training courses, overseas events, etc., will be posted.  Only SEXTON graduates will have access to this area, which is an added benefit of going through our highly acclaimed training academy.

If you wish to find out if you qualify for one of our training programs and to receive the rewards that membership in our exclusive graduate club offers, e-mail us at; training@sextonsecurity.com and mention code; TR11.

Introduction to Executive Protection in Las Vegas


There are many people across the United States who wonder what it would be like to be a bodyguard…how much money can you make, what it would be like to work with the rich and famous…

If you have ever considered working as an Executive Protection Agent, you may have researched the type of school you would need to attend for this specialized training. If you did, you probably know that the cost is a few thousand dollars.

For most people, that is a considerable investment – speaking of the short term anyway. Long term – it is little compared to college tuition and after you are certified, you can make a lucrative living and have an exciting career, that many others can only dream about.

If you are considering a career change,taking early retirement, or perhaps know someone who is thinking about Executive Protection as a career, wouldn’t it be better to find out first hand what is involved before paying out money for something that you/they are not even sure might be the right choice?

We think so, that is why we hold E.P. introduction classes in various cities around the United States. Our next Bodyguard Intro class will be held in downtown Las Vegas on 3/20/11. We will share all the “secrets” about being a bodyguard in that class. Attendees may ask as many questions as they need in order to decide if working as an Executive Protection Agent is really for them.

Some of the topics which will be discussed include; how much money you can expect to make – both in the U.S. and overseas (very important when it comes to getting an assignment as you want to be sure you are being paid a fair amount), how to work overseas, how to network and build a list of contacts that will assist you with employment, what a school should be teaching you,what they should be charging you (it is just as bad to pay too little as it is to pay too much), different laws in the U.S., when you can carry a weapon, etc.

This is only a small example of what you will learn during the presentation. The cost to attend the class is $125.00 and is a small investment when you consider it could save you $1000′s. As an added benefit, we will even refund the class fee to anyone who wishes to take our E.P. training in Las Vegas in September or, at any other location within 12 months of the presentation.

Remember, this presentation is not just for our training, but for the Executive Protection profession as a whole. Armed with all of the insider information we will give, you will be in a far better position to make an informed decision on not only where to train and how much to spend, but if this line of work is really for you.

Seating is strictly limited, so to reserve your place in class and to avoid disappointment, e-mail us at; training@sextonsecurity.com for a registration form today. Unless you would rather go to the introduction seminar in May – but that will be held in Bangkok.

Las Vegas – Introduction to Executive Protection 3/20/11

Do Bodyguards Scare "Friendly" People?

We are seeing a lot being written following the recent tragic events in Tuscon. An article in The Atlantic makes some statements which are bound to raise many eyebrows from those working within the private sector.

In the piece titled; “How to protect members of Congress”,the writer states that it would be better to use local Police instead of bodyguards, since the Police won’t intimidate “friendly” people from attending the event (and bodyguards would?).

After making comments and an argument for using Law Enforcement, the article then becomes self-contradictory by stating that many Law Enforcement Agencies (including the U.S. Secret Service) do not have the available resources to assign officers/agents to protective duties for everyone who may ask for it.

The article does however, raise some good points and provide relevant information. One example is a quote from Gavin de Becker regarding the benefits of keeping the general public back from the speaker, which allows the protectors adequate time to spot a potential problem person.

My favorite “bad choice” from the article has to be regarding the fact that Police will be able to spot someone approaching with bad intentions. The writer could do well to spend a few days visiting some E.P. training schools in the country in order to get an idea of how E.P. Agents are trained.

I think the writers should receive some feed back from our profession. They don’t seem to have done their homework in their rush to get out this topical article. The floor is all yours, ladies and gentlemen. I think it time to shed some light.

Know how to spot a worthless certificate (and "training school")


Some say that there are three types of people in the world and they can all be equated to animals; Wolves, Sheepdogs and Sheep.

The Sheep are the everyday honest-to-goodness citizens, who go about their business with little knowledge or awareness of the seamier side of life. Then there are the sheepdogs – the protectors – that is where we fit in. Those of us who have dedicated or wish to dedicate our lives to the protection of others.

Which leaves the Wolves. Wolves are the rapists, child molestors, drug dealers, murderers and of course; conmen/conwomen. In the same manner as a wolf will sneak up on a flock of sheep and single out the young or infirm, a conman will present an opportunity where he/she is most likley to snare an unsuspecting victim.

Today, I’d like to discuss one particular example of how frauds can separate you from your hard-earned money. It involves “training”, or more accurately; “the lack of training’.

Over the years, I have been contacted by students who have sent off money to people they did not know in the hopes that they would either find them a job in Executive Protection or place them in a “great E.P. school”. Just recently, a young guy asked my advice about such a school.

I became concerned after spending little more than five minutes on their website. There were spelling and gramatical errors on several pages. Folks, if you discover spelling mistakes on a website, that should be your first clue that there may be a problem. I have conducted pirated merchandise investigations in the past and misspelled words were always a dead give away that the item was a fake.

Another concern was the fact that they were selling cookbooks on another page. There is nothing wrong with an E.P. training school selling books on Executive Protection on their website, but when they include cookbooks, that tells me that they are looking to take in money by any means possible.

Taking a look at their list of Agents, I soon realized that none had mentioned attending a well recognized school and they all had attended the in-house “training program”. A little bit of digging showed me that the “training program” consisted of a DVD only. Phrases such as; “Learned how to protect my client”, or “available to work overseas” were all cut and pasted and part of everyone’s Bio.

Lastly, a quick Google search of the school’s name produced a number of complaints filed by unhappy students who claimed that they sent off their money, but never received anything in return. The moral of the story; Do your Due Dilgence. Ask trusted professionals for their advice, ask to contact past graduates, find out what State, National or International Associations to which the school belongs.

Don’t be convinced because they tell you how to “learn to be a Bodyguard from the comfort of your living room”, or because they send you a nice certificate with your name on it (maybe not even spelled correctly). You CAN’T learn to be an E.P. Agent at home.

If you want to be a Sheepdog, you’d better start learning how to spot the wolves. Afterall, sheep’s lives are depending on you.

(Bodyguard) Training your way to success


I was talking to a colleague’s wife today who had been thinking of leaving her well paid job for greener pastures. She knew it would be difficult to find better as she is making very high five figures and has tenure and great benefits.

She was surprised though that she did not receive one reply after sending out 12 applications. Not even a “thank you”. She has now changed her mind about making any changes and is more content with the job she has.

If you work construction, admin or a customer service position, it’s difficult and time consuming to work your way up in the organization. Afterall, there are a lot of people who can do what you do and when that happens, upward mobility is limited. In other words, be careful about asking for a pay raise.

Training in Executive Protection is a different story, however. A person who has made up their mind to be an E.P. Agent can not only make good money, but can carve out a career that could involve working with celebrities (both pros and cons),working overseas, working in exciting locations, etc.

We should point out, that “making one’s mind up” is only a beginning. Specialized training is the most important step after you have decided that this is the right decision for you. This is the kind of training that SEXTON will be holding in Orlando from 11/7 – 11/13/10.

At this last Personal Protection Specialist training program of 2010, we will teach all attendees the importance of not only making up their minds to be E.P. Agents, but how to be the type of Agent who will build a great reputation and be requested to work for many different clients on many different assignments. The secret is not just to “Be”, but to “Be the Best”.

If you are ready to be the best, contact us at; training@sextonsecurity.com
to make sure your registration gets in before the deadline. Train to do a specialized job where companies will be looking for you. We know what we are talking about. We look for the best graduates from each class and hire them to protect our own clients.

Why a guaranteed passing grade is not a good thing

There is a conversation going on at the moment over on a LinkedIn security site. Since it may be of use to current and future Executive Protection Agents, I thought we would take a look at some of the points raised.

Firstly, I would like to say that if making security is a long-term career goal for you,then you should take the time to research “LinkedIn” as it could be instrumental in your choice of careers (not just security either – with 75 million members, I believe that all industries and fields are represented).

The question was asked last week regarding the failure rate versus passing rate of students undergoing Executive Protection training. If you are new to the field, you may not be aware of the various schools, their licensing, topics taught, scenarios delivered or employment opportunities available.

While nobody wants to fail a course, especially one that you have had to save up in order to attend, it takes away from the value of the certificate awarded if anybody off the street is allowed to pass the training, just because they paid their money.

We do not have reason to fail many students, since the great majority know what they want, have made the sacrifice to attend training and give their all over the 90 + hours of instruction. Every once in a great while though, someone comes along who for one reason or other, is not cut out for Executive Protection and we have to remove them from the training.

We do not let them continue as it is unfair on the other students who are being forced to slow down by this one person, or be otherwise distracted. When we make the decision, we calculate how much time is left and refund them the portion of the remainder of the course.

This is the ethical thing to do. Not only does their attendance interfere with the other students’ training, but by allowing someone to pass and graduate who does not fully grasp the requirements and seriousness of the job, that school is endangering all Agents and Clients who come in contact with that one problem Agent.

Unfortunately, most of us know of someone like this who was “rubber stamped” by some other training school because they either didn’t want to lose the revenue or were afraid of being sued if they turned someone away. Many of us went through training programs and were told that not every one would make the grade, yet all did, even the one(s) that everybody knew did not belong.

Some schools would have you believe that there is no need to fail people since they screen potential students so well. I say; Rubbish. I have seen students with no previous security experience (but plenty of life experience), who make first rate protectors. Screening them or someone else with 15 years of documented security experience, will tell you very little about that person.

The only way a school could be fairly certain whether a potential student would fit into a training program would be to submit them to a barage of tests – psychological and personality testing the likes of which Police candidates experience. I have never heard of a school doing that. Perhaps a proprietory training program would, but only for those they were interested in hiring.

Don’t be afraid to attend any school who are particular about who they train and pass. Embrace the fact that they don’t take their money in one door and send them out the other door with a certificate, whether they deserve it or not.

Be careful not to look cheap like the Washington Nationals

I’m sure that many of you have heard these “business buzz words” before; “giving added value or added benefit” to your clients. Many writers in the security field have written about the need to give extra service as a way to stand out from the crowd.

I think it’s an outstanding idea. We incorporate it in the way we deal with clients and potential clients. I knew a private investigation business owner in the D.C. area who used to charge clients a hefty consultation fee when they would call up to ask about hiring this person.

We give free consulations. I feel that it is very important to educate the client about what a private investigator or E.P. Agent can and will do for them. Even if they eventually hire someone cheaper, I have given them pointers about what can and just as important, what can’t be done.

These days it is especially important to “under promise and over deliver”. Just about everyone is feeling the effects of this tough economy. Consumers are shopping around more and making longer decisions before parting with their hard-earned cash.

That is why I was so surprised with the way the Washington Nationals treat their customers/fans. A couple of days ago I booked some tickets online to take my five year old son to his first Baseball game at Nationals’ Stadium this afternoon.

I’m well aware of taxes and costs that are levied on hotel rooms, airline tickets, concert tickets etc. It’s common practice and the likes of the airline industry keeps finding ways to charge us to the point of turning it an art form.

Back to the Nationals tickets. Sure I had to pay a booking fee and entertainment or sports tax, but the last surcharge before pressing the send button on my credit card really took the biscuit.

I had three choices of how I wanted the tickets delivered. Firstly, I could have the online tickets sent to my e-mail, secondly I could have the tickets texted to my phone and thirdly I could have them left at the “will call” box office.

I opted for the third option. Option one and two all had a cost associated with them. It was a small cost; $1.50, but why should I have to pay anything at all to have an automatic responder send an e-mail or send a text? Was it not enough buying four tickets and spending more money at the concession stands before leaving the stadium?

If you want to impress a client or impress your employer – don’t penny pinch. Don’t “cut things too close”. If you are assigned to be at a location at 5pm, don’t plan on getting there at 4:59pm. If you do, you’ll most probably wind up arriving at 5:05pm, or later. There’s an old saying that goes; “Early is on time, on time is late and late is being fired”.

If you are late (which you should never be in the first place of course), don’t try to send in a time sheet the next week stating that you were early. You probably won’t get away with it, but even if you did, would an extra 10 or 15 minutes pay be worth tarnishing your ethical and moral fibre?

I ask, because I have seen and see it happen. Trust me when I say that it makes me look at someone in a whole different light when I see them try to claim time that they did not work.

On the other side of the coin, when I see an employee show up at an assignment 20 or 30 minutes early, or my favorite – go out and advance a location eventhough they were not asked to do that, I look at them in a WHOLE different light.

That is the personification of added value. That is someone who gets it and will go far.