D.C. Police Chief Admits that Charlie Sheen Escort Violated Department Policies

In his article in the Washington Times about the Charlie Sheen Police Escort,  Matthew Cella quoted MPD Police Chief Cathy Lanier as having admitted that the Sheen escort broke multiple department rules.  No offense Cathy or Matthew, but those of us in the Executive Protection field realized that, the minute we saw crazy Charlie taking a cell phone picture of the speed odometer, documenting for the world to see that the D.C. Police cruiser in front was pushing 80 miles an hour, 30 miles outside of their jurisdiction.

I do have to say, that Chief Lanier sounded very honest and open during the WTOP radio interview this afternooon when talking about how one of her “middle managers” (“probably a Lieutenant”, she said) wrongfully authorized the problematic escort of a Hollywood celebrity.  I was about ready to give her a “thumbs up” until she began justifying why her officers would have broken the rules.   

Chief Lanier went on to tell the interviewer that it wasn’t really that surprising that her officers went outside of their jurisdiction, sped and drove with their emergency lights flashing.  “Afterall”, she said, “Police are only human and we can’t expect them not to be awe struck when dealing with celebrities”.  What you talkin’ about Cathy? 

Yes, Police Officers are human, but no – they are certainly not like the average citizen.  They go through a different training, have broad sweeping powers that regular people do not share and have the ability to take another’s liberty and even life, if necessary.  They should damn well be held to a higher standard and we should expect far more from them than we would do from a 13 year old girl waiting for a “Bieber appearance” outside of a concert hall.  

I would wager that if you took a survey of all Executive Protection Agents (definitely all E.P. Agency owners), they would tell you that when they are hired to work in close proximity of a celebrity, they are not “awe struck” by that person.  If I ever discovered that one of my bodyguards had broken the law or embarrased my company or themselves on an E.P. detail, that would be the last time they would work for me.  The ironic thing is that when it comes to private sector Executive Protection, most Agents are more highly trained and experienced than local Police Officers.         

Apparently, the Metropolitan Police Department rules allows officers to perform escort duty for The President, Vice Prez, visiting Heads of State and the Mayor.  I sure am glad that I am not an MPD “middle manager” trying to figure out which category that “Tiger Blood” Charlie fits into. 

Overseas travel could be more dangerous following Bin Laden’s death.

While the U.S. (and other Nations) rejoices following the news of Bin Laden’s death, those about to embark on overseas travel, especially those holding U.S. passports, should exercise extreme caution.

Not only has the State Department issued travel alerts (http://www.emergencyemail.org/newsemergency/anmviewer.asp?a=1058&z=1 ), but a plethora of INTEL and Govt. types have also issued warnings concerning the need to be aware of the possibility of retaliatory attacks.   It is too simplistic to feel that Bin Laden’s demise will bring about the downfall of Al-Qaeda.  

Whilst it is true that the A.Q. organization will be “leaderless” until they can find a suitable replacement, this does not mean that they are not capable of inflicting serious casualties to “get back” at those who have denied them of their leader.  This can be looked upon as a type of “wounded animal” syndrome. 

Speaking on CNN’s “Piers Morgan” last night, former NYC Mayor, Rudy Giuliani said; “in the short term we are in more danger, but in the longer term, we will be safer”.  The question remains however; ”how long is “in the short term”?  I have an immediate vested interest in trying to understand the viewpoint of these grieving radicals, since I will be flying to a volatile part of Asia next week.

My advice is not to take chances with your safety.  If travel can not be avoided or postponed, focus intently on your own personal safety and on the safety of those you send overseas – whether employees or family members.  This reminds me of a call I received from a potential client last year. 

He and other staff members were going to Pakistan to form a joint venture involving a lucrative project for his company.  He was concerned for their safety and asked about bringing U.S. bodyguards on the trip.  The host company in Pakistan told him that they would provide the foreigners with local security.

Having worked around the world on many International assignments, I was experienced in how certain countries train their personnel.  I advised the potential new client to bring experienced U.S. security personnel as part of their team.  The busines owner was concerned that he might insult his new business partners if they discovered that they had brought their own security consultants. 

This is why it is important to find a highly experienced security consultant and LISTEN to what they tell you.  There are ways to include highly trained and experienced security personnel with your staff so that they blend in as engineers or legal assitants or whatever else may be your business.  What you should NEVER do, is to to compromise your safety or the safety of your employees.   

If something happens, what effect do you think it will have on your company’s reputation?  Ask yourself is it worth it.  Our advice to you is not to rely on local resources, but to bring those experts with you – either openly or covertly.  Remember that training standards in many other parts of the world are nowhere near the level that they are in the U.S.

Most affairs now begin online – 20% from Facebook

Did you know that around 70% of all affairs these days begin online, or that 20% begin on Facebook?

Which isn’t really all that surprising, seeing as how this is the electronic age.  It does change how spouses and significant others address the problem though.  Before virtually everyone had access to a computer, people met others at work, after work, at a gym – usually relatively close to home, unless they met someone on a business trip.

These days however, people can search for a clandestine meeting in the comfort of their own home.  There are sites that make it easy to find a stranger, or even a former girlfirend or boyfriend who may have moved away from the area years before.   

One thing that has not changed all that much are the signs to look for that someone is having an affair.  In this article written by Jayne Keedle for the Albany Times Union; 

http://www.dailycomet.com/article/20110415/WIRE/110419611/1008?Title=Signs-your-partner-may-be-cheating

we see that people involved in affairs will often have changes in personality, dress, habits, etc.  There are also “electronic signs” to look for; a secret cell phone, going outside to take calls/read text messages, or staying up late at night on the computer (which is kept locked/coded).

One thing to be very aware of is that the other person very often has a “reasonable expectation of privacy”, which means that you may be breaking the law by “hacking into’ their computer to read e-mails.  Federal laws may apply and stiff penalties such as large fines and jail sentences may be imposed, so be very careful not to break the law.

If you suspect that something may be taking place, it is advisable to hire a professional investigator – one who knows and obeys the law.  An experienced investigator will review your case and advise you how to gather evidence from surveillance, social media, etc.

How Private Investigators Interview to find “Bad Guys”

How many companies with security problems use their own internal resources to investigate employee theft, industrial espionage, etc. ?  I think the answer would probably be; “the majority”. 

HR Departments have traditionally been the ”go to” people within corporations to conduct interviews.  Proprietory security personnel have also been used for these tasks. My question is; “what specialized training or experience have these folks received that equips them for such roles? 

Having conducted interviews totalling in the thousands around the world, I can share with you that it takes many years and probably thousands of hours of interviewing to develop not only a certain comfort level, but the ability to be able to pick up on things like eye movement, breathing, body shifting, hesitation, etc. 

What experienced investigators know is that simply talking to a person and taking notes is not enough.  The interview process begins way before that.  A good investigator will conduct research and prepare questions before the interview ever begins.  They know that there are a number of important factors to consider, such as planning on where the interviewee will sit.  Have you previously considered this?

Some other questions to consider are; “do I know the right questions to ask?”, ”what are the signs of stress?”, “how can I make a person tell me what I need to know?”, “how do I follow-up?”.  Unfortunately, you won’t find all the answers you need in a blog or a book.  It takes time, training and putting that training into practice. 

Corporations should not feel like they have to “do it all”.  In-house security personnel may be quite capable of taking care of many of the day-t0-day security tasks that arise, but they probably should not be asked to conduct investigations involving employee theft, sexual harrassment, workman’s comp, fraud cases etc., where extensive interviewing is needed. 

Credentialed and experienced professionals can not only save a company millions of dollars in lost revenue and or litigation/law suits, but protect their reputation from being tarnished and damaged.  The question then becomes; “what value do you put on your reputation?”. 

New online sign-up for P.I., Executive Protection and Firearms Training

Sexton Executive Security is pleased to announce that applicants for any of our training programs; Defensive Tactics, Firearms, Private Investigator or Executive Protection/Personal Protection Specialist, can now apply directly online.

Our newly restructured website will allow applicants to register and pay for training courses, 24 hours a day, from anywhere in the world.  In addition, we will soon have training manuals, e-books, unique SEXTON items (t-shirts, shooting caps, mag lights, etc) for sale via the new “shopping cart” feature of the site.

There will also be a section where employment opportunities, discounted training courses, overseas events, etc., will be posted.  Only SEXTON graduates will have access to this area, which is an added benefit of going through our highly acclaimed training academy.

If you wish to find out if you qualify for one of our training programs and to receive the rewards that membership in our exclusive graduate club offers, e-mail us at; [email protected] and mention code; TR11.

Private Investigator Training in Virginia

A new batch of potential P.I.s arrived in for training at the headquarters of SEXTON yesterday morning.

During the first day of training, students learned about the Governmental body which regulates private security in the Commonwealth of Virginia; the Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS).

They also learned about laws governing covert surveillance and voice recording, stalking, GPS tracking devices, interviewing and interrogation, how to open a P.I. firm and the licensing. That all in the first day!

Today, students are receiving a lecture from a court officer on the judicial system, how to properly testify, accompanying a client to obtain a restraining order from the Magistrate, etc.

I would say look out for the new graduates…..but after the top tier training they receive this week, you won’t know who they are!

Bodyguards on YouTube

A lot of people think they know what a bodyguard does. It is definitely not all about being chased by bad guys at 90 mph or shooting while hanging out of moving vehicles.

It is however, very similar to this YouTube video. This is a typical detail – picking up a client from the airport and escorting them back to their hotel or a shopping trip.

If you happen to be in Las Vegas in about three weeks, you can find out more about working as an Executive Protection Agent, as we will hold our “Introduction to Executive Protection” on 3/20/11.

Anyone who attends the one day training will have their fee reimbursed if they later decide to take one of our Personal Protection Specialist training programs.

Do you have what it takes to be a Bodyguard?

What the HELL is social media – in 2 minutes

Everybody reading this is already aware of what social media is, obviously, since blogging is one form. I challenge you though, to take 2 minutes and digest the stats in this youtube video.

We have incorporated social media awareness in the security training programs which we teach. When attendees ask; “how can I get employers to notice me?”, we show them how they can brand themselves. If it’s good enough for McDonald’s and Cialis, don’t you think it’s something you should be doing too?

Reach millions with your message. Tell them what you do and how good you can do it. Don’t have $100,000 for a PR campaign? Got 10 minutes for a Linkedin post or putting up a video on youtube or Facebook?

If you don’t, your competition most certainly will.

Doctors and other "Professionals" Lead the Way when Stealing from the Government

At first glance, it sounds like good news that the recent Medicare-Fraud crackdown uncovered more than $240 million in fraudulent billing and payments in nine Metropolitan areas.

The investigator in me knows there is always more, however. Sometime the “more” lays lurking beneath the surface like an iceberg. Such is the case with Medicare Fraud. $240 million sounds like a whole lot, until you realize that Medicare fraud costs the Government/tax payer $90 BILLION a year.

In an article for the Wall Street Journal, writers; Mark Schoofs, Maurice Tamman and Brent Kendall disclose some of the criminal activity and the medical “professionals” who are being charged with the crimes.

In one case, a Brooklyn physical therapist, Aleksander Kharkover, billed the Government $11.9 Million from 2005 – 2010 for services that were never performed not medically necessary. Medicare paid out $7.3 Million. Kharkover’s lawyer calls his client a “well respected doctor”. In another case a podiatrist billed the Government millions for removing toenails. Patients being interviewed admitted to only receiving foot baths. The podiatrist billed for one patient as having had 18 ingrown toenail removals.

One wonders how much of this money will be recovered. One Law Enforcement Official stated that the problem was so huge that “you can’t prosecute your way out of this problem – you have to have more effective monitoring of the money that goes out”. It’s a shame that somebody didn’t think a wee bit of monitoring on $90 BILLION a year would have been worthwhile before now.

As for prosecutions, they had better be planning on prosecuting these sleaze balls. Why should the average small-fish tax payer have to give his or her fair(?) share of taxes and these corrupt whales not be penalized for ripping off the system?

How well do you know your babysitter?


If someone else other than your mother takes care of your children when you work, the question you need to be asking is; “how well do I really know that person?”

For instance, how many parents ask for a babysitter’s driving record? Our survey suggests that not many do. If the babysitter is tasked with picking up/dropping off a child to and from school, wouldn’t it seem like a good idea to know if they have a history of speeding, have been charged with reckless driving or even have insurance?

The Linkedin Investigator marketing group reposted a story written by Basil Katz for Reuters in which two background investigators talk about the steps they take to check out a nanny for families. We have also been hired to do this, but it is strange that clients appear to be more concerned about checking out a new hire than the person entrusted with their own children.

As far as I am concerned, parents should be far more concerned about doing a nanny/babysitter/au pair check than a CEO when bringing on new staff. An employee can do things which are prohibited; waste time on the internet, call in sick when they aren’t, steal, etc. Have you ever stopped to think what an unethical/criminal child minder could do?

That is why the “nanny cam” industry has been exploding. If parents could rely on those who take care of their children, there would not be a need for so many hidden cameras in smoke detectors, wall clocks and inside teddy bears. Even if you don’t think your babysitter could hurt or neglect your child, what do you know about her boyfriend? How do you know he doesn’t come around when you have left?

If you are a parent and reading this, it is not meant to scare you, but to make you think and look beyond what appears to be for what could be. I have conducted thousands of investigative interviews and I can assure you that people don’t give reference names of those they think will say something bad about them.

If you are an investigator reading this, pay extra attention when conducting background checks on these types of job applicants. Experienced investigators will know the questions to ask to get the information they need to find people who aren’t “staged”.

Parents or investigators should never cut corners when finding out about potential child care applicants. Spend longer and look deeper. The children deserve it.